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Skin Cancer And Lesions

Approximately 1 in 10 people in the UK are diagnosed with skin cancer during their lifetime.

 

The incidence of Malignant Melanoma, the most dangerous type of skin cancer, is increasing faster than any other cancer, with rates having more than quadrupled in the last thirty years.  It is now the second most common cancer in young adults, aged 14-34.

 

Each year in the UK there are approximately 100,000 new cases of non-melanoma skin cancer and 11,000 new cases of malignant melanoma and the rates are rising.

 

The main reason behind this is increased sun exposure: with more and more people going on hot foreign holidays and the rise of sun-bed use.  People who have fair skin and/or burn easily in the sun have an increased risk of skin cancer, as do people with a lot of moles or freckles.

 

Melanomas often occur in existing moles.  So any mole or skin patch that gets larger, darker, irregular at the edges, or bleeds without trauma, should be looked at by your GP straight away.

 

If, however, you feel that your concerns have not been adequately dealt with, then you should visit a specialist used to seeing skin cancers.

 

Mr Ali is happy to examine any moles which you might be concerned about and advise you whether the mole(s) need to be tested via a biopsy.  If this is the case, it is usually a simple procedure, using a local anaesthetic.  Every effort will be made to ensure that any scarring is as inconspicuous as possible.

 

Your mole(s) will be sent for examination under a microscope by a consultant pathologist.  The results usually take 2-5 weeks.  In the event that your mole is found to be cancerous, then an appointment will be made to discuss the treatment recommendations with you straight away.

 

To find out more about melanoma Click here

To find out more about Skin Cancer Click here

For further information about this treatment Click here